albion saddle for sale
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albion saddle for sale

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The last of the bridle albion saddle for sale groups is that which gives control through pressure on the nose alone. This type is often called a ‘hackamore’, the name deriving from the Spanish ‘jaquima’ – a noseband, used by the domador (trainer) in preparing the horse for the ‘spade’ bit (a curb bit albion saddle for sale with a solid high port resting on the tongue and sufficiently long to act against the roof of the mouth) which was used by the trainer or ‘reiner’ of the advanced horse, the arrendador. This bitless bridle is part of a sophisticated method of schooling originating the Iberian Peninsula and passing albion saddle for sale from there, by means of the sixteenth century conquistadores, to the Americas. There is remains integral in Western riding, but it has also achieved a more general use in recent years. Many riders employing the European system of training use, or more frequently misuse, the bridle, mistakenly supposing it to be a ‘kinder’ form of control. In fact, in the wrong hands, the bridle is a very severe instrument.

The development of the bridle began early in the history of a man’s association with horses, and in comparative terms it was not long before a satisfactory form of harness albion saddle for sale evolved. Perhaps surprisingly, the albion saddle for sale and more particularly the stirrup, were introduced much later. Most of the pre-Christian horse peoples used coverings and pads, some of the latter being quite elaborate, on the backs of their horses, although Zenophon (430-355 BC), possibly because he was a Spartan, decried the practice, maintaining that the bare legs of a man wrapped around the sweating coat of his horse gave more security.

The limitations of cavalry operating without the security afforded by a saddle and stirrups would seem to be obvious. Primarily, of course, it prohibited the cavalry soldier from closing with the enemy, but it was not until the fourth century that a albion saddle for sale constructed on a wood foundation, the ‘tree’ was in use, and it took almost another hundred years before the stirrup was invented and made possible the cavalry charge against bodies of infantry.

Charles Chenevix Trench, author of A History of Horsemanship and a contributor to this book, has this comment to make: “It is surprising that horsemen took 1500 years to think up something so simple. One is reluctantly albion saddle for sale driven to the distasteful conclusion that we are not really a very bright set of people.” It is probable that it was the Sarmatians, a people later absorbed by the Goths, who used a tree and produced a saddle built high at the pommel and cantle to enclose the rider. Credit for the stirrup goes to the Huns of Attila, and a Chinese office writing in AD 477 confirms its use by these Mongolian horsemen.

The same type of enclosing albion saddle for sale served the mediaeval knight, whose long stirrups were hung well forward so as to allow the rider to brace himself against the cantle. This position prevented his being thrown forward and enabled him to withstand the impact of the charge against the infantry without departing unceremoniously over the horse’s rump. That saddle exists in recognizable form today as the Western Saddle. The selle royale, still used at the classical schools of Saumur and Vienna, the home of the Spanish Riding School, and those saddles currently in use in Portugal and Spain, are its direct descendants and little different from the saddles of the albion saddle for sale late Renaissance Period.
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albion saddle for sale
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Home | Saddles for sale | Sell your saddle | Saddle fitting guide & help | Contact us |

enquiries@horsesaddlesforsale.co.uk