bates saddle for sale
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bates saddle for sale

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The curb bit bates saddle for sale of the armoured knights of the Middle Ages, which existed in only slightly altered form well into the eighteenth century and even later, was made necessary by the sheer size and strength of the heavy horses that were needed to carry a fully armoured man and his weapons, as well as the weight of bates saddle for sale their own protective armour. To control such an animal, and more particularly to put him in a state of balance which would facilitate the manoeuvres required in battle or later at the joust and tournament, a mechanical force of some power was needed if the animal’s weight was to be placed over the hindquarters and the forehand lightened in consequence. The use of the bit to bates saddle for sale place the horse in a balance persisted well into the Renaissance period which marked the beginnings of the ‘classical art’. The early Masters, like Federico Grisone in Naples and his pupil Pignatelli, did, however, stress the importance of preserving the lightness of the mouth, achieving their object by the use, once more, of the spiked noseband. Even so, from a study of their books, (Grisone’s Gli Ordini di Cavalcare was published in 1550), it is clear that little bates saddle for sale emphasis was put on the supplying of the horse and the development of his posture by a progression of exercises, while great store continued to be set on breaking the animal’s resistance by forceful means. During this period the prototype of the modern double bridle emerged, with the addition to the curb bit of a thin bradoon, the ‘flying trench’, which was operated by bates saddle for sale second rein. Recognition of the fact that flexion at the poll has to be accompanied by a corresponding relaxation of the lower jaw was marked by the occasional use of metal ‘keys’ fitted to the centre of the mouthpiece to encourage the horse to play with the bit and create saliva in the mouth. The Greek bates saddle for sale general Zenophon had, in fact, used the same device on a snaffle bit some 1800 years previously and the modern straight—bar ‘mouthing’ bit used in the breaking of young horses, and similarly fitted with keys, varies only slightly in detail from that used by the Spartan horsemen.

The curb bit, bates saddle for sale , however, with its cheek-pieces often as long as 37cm, held its place as the chief weapon in the horseman’s armoury until, at the beginning of the seventeenth century, the later classical masters, like Pluvinel and Newcastle, encouraged the individual study of horses and more patient and gentler methods were advocated in their training.

By the following century the art of classical riding had become established, largely through the teachings of the Frenchman Francois do la Gueriniere, who is known as the Father of Classical Equitation, and while the curb bit continued as a predominant influence, it ceased bates saddle for sale to be regarded as an instrument of coercion. From that point on, the tendency was towards the milder bits, but the obsession with the positioning of the head and the control of the horse through the bit continued to occupy the minds of horsemen right up to our own bates saddle for sale century , despite the increasing frequency and volume of the exhortation ‘legs before hands.

The nineteenth century bates saddle for sale and the first part of the twentieth produced a huge variety of bits, all of which were acclaimed, at least by their ingenious inventors, as the panacea for all equine bates saddle for sale ills.
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bates saddle for sale
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Home | Saddles for sale | Sell your saddle | Saddle fitting guide & help | Contact us |

enquiries@horsesaddlesforsale.co.uk