gp saddle for sale
Home | Saddles for sale | Sell your saddle | Saddle fitting guide & help | Contact us |
gp saddle for sale

enquiries@horsesaddlesforsale.co.uk

In 1906 the Swedish Count Clarence von Rosen had put a gp saddle for sale proposition to the Congress of the International Olympic Committee that equestrian sports should be included on a permanent basis in the Games there had been none at all in St Louis in 1904 and although the suggestion was not greeted with gp saddle for sale abundant enthusiasm, Baron Pierre de Coubertin, the founder of the modern Games, asked von Rosen to present more detailed proposals to the 1907 Congress. These were for three events dressage, an equestrian pentathlon and a game called jeu de rose.

The British members of the IOC agreed that these gp saddle for sale should be included in the 1908 Games, which were to be held in London, and the committee of the International Horse Show consented to organize them, provided there was a minimum of twenty-four entries from six different gp saddle for sale countries. In fact there were eighty-eight entries from eight countries, which perhaps proved too much for the International Show, itself still in its infancy. At the last minute the equestrian events were dropped form the Olympic programme. Von Rosen did not lose heart, however. The next Olympics were to be held in Stockholm, and in 1909 a committee, with himself as secretary-general and Prince Carl of Sweden as president, produced three events for the 1912 Games. These were dressage, gp saddle for sale, a three-day event, otherwise known as the Military, and show jumping. International jumping was increasing. In 1909, the first Lucerne show was held, with Italians, Germans, French and Belgians in opposition to the Swiss. That same year the National Horse gp saddle for sale Show in New York introduced international jumping. A team of five British army officers, captained by Major J.G. Beresford, took part, and won one of the events. Four years later, a military team competition, a forerunner of the Nations Cup, was held at the show.

Team jumping was held at the London International for the first time in 1909 when the French won the inaugural King Edward VII Cup. Before the show gp saddle for sale, in common with almost all others, was suspended for the First World War, and before the Russian revolution, the Tsarist cavalry gp saddle for sale came to London to complete a glorious hat-trick of wins of the Cup, in 1912-13, under the leadership of Captain Paul Rodzianko. He and his compatriots took the King Edward VII Cup, which they had then won outright, back to Russia in 1914, and it was never seen again.

The 1912 Olympic Show Jumping was run under a complicated set of rules. Ten marks were given for each fence, with deductions for faults; for example, a first refusal cost two marks, a second, or fall of horse gp saddle for sale and rider, four, a third, or fall of rider only, six. Clearly it was considered more ignominious to fall off a horse than to cause him to fall too. There were marks for hitting a fence with hind or forelegs, for landing on or within the demarcation line of a spread fence, and all together so many complications that judging must have been far from easy.

In the 1912 Games each country was allowed gp saddle for sale to enter six competitors for the individual jumping and four, with the best three scores counting, for the team. Eight countries Belgium, Chile, France, Germany, Britain, Norway, Russia and Sweden entered a total fo thirty-one riders in the individual which was won by Captain Cariou of France, also the winner of a bronze in the three day gp saddle for sale event. Sweden won the team gold medal from France and Germany followed, in order, by the United States, Russia and Belgium.
Saddle
gp saddle for sale
www.horsesaddlesforsale.co.uk
Home | Saddles for sale | Sell your saddle | Saddle fitting guide & help | Contact us |

enquiries@horsesaddlesforsale.co.uk