keiffer saddle for sale
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keiffer saddle for sale

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A distinction keiffer saddle for sale should be made between the words “saddlery” and “harness”, the latter in particular being often misused. Saddlery refers to the equipment of the riding horse, while harness is used to describe the accoutrements of the driving horse. To the further confusion of the uninitiated, horsemen will frequently refer to both as ‘tack’ or ‘tackle’. In general terms, saddlery is keiffer saddle for sale concerned with the saddle and bridle and their accompanying auxiliaries, such as girths, leathers and martinagles. It can extend to cover all items made of leather, even if some of those items such as muzzles, headcollars, etc., are applicable to both riding and harness horses keiffer saddle for sale. Bandages, rugs and blankets, however, are grouped under the composite term ‘horse clothing.’

The early horse peoples managed their horses with the minimum of equipment, concentrating, naturally enough, on methods of control. Initially, control of the horse may have been achieved by a form of noseband encompassing the lower jaws and fitted above the nostrils. Illustrations of Syrian horsemen of the fourteenth century BC show this rudimentary form of bridle quite clearly. There is, however, evidence of a more sophisticated keiffer saddle for sale bridle, involving the use of a bit, used at an earlier date still. On the tomb of Horenhab of Egypt, dated circa 1600 BC, a horseman is depicted on an obviously spirited horse ridden in a snaffle bridle of surprisingly modern design.

As the use of mounted horsemen keiffer saddle for sale increased and selective breeding, combined with hand-feeding (i.e. with corn, an energizing foodstuff), produced horses of more quality and spirit, so a greater emphasis was placed on the means of control through the agency of the bridle. By the time the Assyrians had emerged as a major horse people, a bitting arrangement had been devised that gave to the rider a very acceptable degree of control over his mount. Two hundred years later, when the Persians of the sixth century BC had superseded the Assyrians as the leading nation of horsemen, the bridle keiffer saddle for sale had become and even more forceful instrument, largely because of a notable change to a heavier type of horse. These horses would have certainly been corn-fed and they are depicted in various sculptures in a heavily collected posture with the head over-bend, a keiffer saddle for sale carriage that would certainly give more control to the rider. The bits used to affect this imposed balance were the familiar phallic-cheeked snaffles combined with a noseband which seems to have been set with knobs or spikes (like the Spanish careta still used today) and with the addition of a strap fastened below the bit that is very similar to our modern drop noseband. There were, however, exceptions to the obsessive interest in control. The Numidian cavalry which marched with Hannibal, for instance, managed their small ponies without resort to a bridle keiffer saddle for sale of any sort, steering their mounts with a switch applied to the appropriate side of the head. History does not reveal how the halt was effected.

Nonetheless, in general terms, the trend continued towards stronger bits, capable of exerting a greater mechanical force and thus allowing the horseman to position and restrain his horse more effectively. From the sixth century BC onwards, bits became increasingly severe, with both Greeks and Persians using keiffer saddle for sale mouthpieces that incorporated sharp rollers and spikes. Somewhere around 300 BC the Celts of Gaul produced the curb bit, an instrument that was to develop to monstrous proportions in the centuries that followed.
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keiffer saddle for sale
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Home | Saddles for sale | Sell your saddle | Saddle fitting guide & help | Contact us |

enquiries@horsesaddlesforsale.co.uk